The Trojan War in Greek Historical Sources

Gates of Nineveh: An Experiment in Blogging Assyriology

The first modern ancient historians often took a harshly critical view of Homer. By the beginning of the modern era, western scholars generally held that the Iliad and Odyssey were myth, that the Trojan war was not an actual event and that the characters of Homer’s poems were not real people. Blaise Pascal wrote in Pensées that Homer “did not think of making a history, but solely a book to amuse; he is the only writer of his time; the beauty of the work has made it last.” He went on to write that “Every history which is not contemporaneous…[is] false, and found to be false in the course of time. It is not so with contemporaneous writers,”[1] which, if taken literally, would mean that this website is in fact a web of falsehood and the practice of studying history should cease. In his massive 11-volume History of Greece (published…

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What if Turkey’s Ataturk Didn’t Exist? What If Turkey Lost Its War for Independence After Fall of Ottomans?

Teaching History's Slender Threads, Including 'What Ifs', Almosts, Alternatives and Turning Points

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Map of (imaginary) partitioned Turkey and the new nation of Kurdistan, courtesy of Lehnaru, who wrote: “Another alternate history map! The Ottoman Empire loses even more badly in WW1 and completely falls apart. Greece wins the war against Turkey, is granted Cyprus by the British, annexes northern Epirus, and takes the Dodecanese from Italy. The Kurds, meanwhile, rightfully earn themselves a state and the Armenians rebuild and endure after the genocide. Russia was devastated by Germany and the civil war went on for quite a bit longer, enabling Georgian, Ukrainian, and Azerbaijani independence. Unfortunately, the French and British empires still betrayed their Arab allies and established their mandates in the Middle East.”

For this to happen, Mustafa Kemel (Ataturk) would not exist. By most accounts, he is one of the Great Men of History who almost single-handedly created the modern Turkish nation. His picture remains in a place of…

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Bakom

¡caPOWera!

Bakom is a hybrid martial art that originated in Peru. Former marine and jujutsu master Roberto Puch Bezada founded Bakom in the 1980s. Bezada was also a former convict from Villa el Salvador in Lima.
Bakom is recognized as a hybrid martial art because it mixes martial arts like jujutsu with street fighting techniques. Jujutsu involves defeating an opponent without a weapon, or with a small weapon.

The street fighting smash mouth style came from the slums at the edge of Lima. Bakom required an emphasis on power, with the attacks designed to ruin an opponents balance. There is also an element of surprise and deception as fighters can use hidden, secretive weapons in battle.

What makes Bakom distinct from other combat practices is the vicious nature of the martial art. The fighting style is made to inflict the maximum amount of pain on the opponent and become too…

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Gate….Or how Anime ruin their own premise just so they can have a harem and pander to otakus.

Fate

Gate was one of those anime of recent season that many people followed whether they liked it or not, simply because they wanted to see how it would turn out. And the reason for that is that Gate has a premise that makes it very easy for the viewer to get hooked onto. I mean really, which one of us didn’t imagine a fantasy vs modern weapons scenario, at least once? It’s just something that by its nature would be interesting to see being played out, because the scenario itself has a lot of potential. The scenario of Gate is essentially that of Native Americans vs Conquering Europeans, expect instead of Native Americans we have a fantasy empire and the Europeans are replaced by the Japanese Self “Defense” Forces or JSDF. Either way, the cultural exchange alone would have made this series worth watching.

Clash1

But sadly Gate trashed its…

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On Being Bullied in Japan

This Japanese Life.

scapegoats

I have been overwhelmed by the sweetness of Japanese kids. One student, seeing me without an umbrella, ran backward through the rain to walk with me under hers. Another classroom, after a lesson on how Christmas was different in America, pitched in to buy me a new pair of work shoes (mine had become quite ratty) as a holiday gift.

It was only two months before I was leaving Japan when I saw, firsthand, otherwise sweet kids turn into stomach-churning brutes, reveling in the hilarity of harassing a fellow student.

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Lets talk about Street Fighter

Conflicting Views

Just… for no apparent reason. I don’t really have anything else on my mind, and for some strange reason, I decided to get the SF Anniversary collection on PS4. This… isn’t really good collection. Everything is an arcade rom, and there’s no DIP switches. So for Turd Strike, I get the shitty original sound track instead of the Dreamcast arranged music. And the crappy Alpha 3 with Mike Bison locked behind a cheatcode.

Seems like a random buying choice as one, I’ve made it clear that I despise Street Fighter, and I’m trying to get away from fighting games due to the content being locked behind greed.

But I’m having withdrawals!

I figured hell, a bunch of roms won’t give me that bullshit. And…. if I’m being honest, there was a point in time where I was indeed a fan of Street Fighter. Not a huge one, mind you.

Well…

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Fighting Games are F@$#ing Hard

Frostilyte Writes

Of all the genres fighting games are the one that I find the most impenetrable. And I don’t think I can put into words how irritating I find that. I’ll never claim to be great at games, but I usually have an idea of what I’m doing within a couple hours of playing something new. From there I can learn, adapt, and evolve. With fighting games though? It doesn’t seem to matter how much time I spend with the genre I never seem to learn.

“But Frosti”, you ask, “Why do you even care?”

Well I’ll tell you why I care.

Travel back in time with me to when I was a little Frostilyte. I was over at a friend’s house and there was four of us, so he busted out Super Smash Bros. This game blew my mind. It was a game with all of Nintendo’s most iconic…

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Review: Street Fighter-Everyone Has To Start Somewhere

spiderslash

SF1

Capcom’s Street Fighter franchise is a series that I hold near and dear to my heart. Ever since I was a toddler the series has stuck with me and has remained a constant source of entertainment throughout my life. Even though I never fully grasped how to play the games until Street Fighter IV (Yes, I’m technically an 08’er) I always had fun just button mashing my way through the games and seeing what kind of wacky character I’ll run into next. The series is so ingrained into me that Ryu, one of the blandest looking characters to ever grace video games, has become one of my absolute favorites and a consistent main of mine in nearly every mainline entry. Street Fighter is one of gaming’s most everlasting and memorable franchises and I think that’s incredibly impressive considering that its first entry was an absolute travesty.

My Great Capture Screenshot 2020-02-19 18-05-53 Still a damn good…

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Sonic the Fighters

Extra Life

Introduction

In the year 1993, a game named Virtua Fighter debuted in arcades worldwide. Created by Yu Suzuki, a member of Sega’s second arcade game development division (Sega AM2), Virtua Fighter became a gigantic success – both commercially and critically. What particularly stood out was its presentation. Whereas many pioneering fighting games used two-dimensional sprites to depict its characters, Virtua Fighter featured three-dimensional polygon graphics. For braving the world of 3D gaming a before it became the standard and offering a level of complexity few contemporaries possessed, Virtua Fighter continues to be praised to this very day with some calling it one of the most influential titles of all time.

During this time, Sega was experiencing a lot of success in the home console market as well. Their 1991 breakout title, Sonic the Hedgehog, gave them a character capable of standing on even ground with Nintendo’s own mascot Mario…

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